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South-South and Triangular Cooperation for food security and nutrition

Published by: WFP


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This publication explores how WFP facilitates South-South cooperation to help countries advance their national objectives and build capacities to fight hunger and malnutrition towards achieving Agenda 2030. Seven case studies showcase how different South-South modalities can be applied on the ground.

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General Information

SDGs Goal 2: Zero hunger Goal 17: Partnerships for the goals
Published
2016
Thematic Area
Food security and nutrition
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End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

Rapid economic growth and increased agricultural productivity over the past two decades has seen the proportion of undernourished people drop by almost half.

Many developing countries that used to suffer from famine and hunger can now meet the nutritional needs of the most vulnerable. Central and East Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean have all made huge progress in eradicating extreme hunger.

These are all significant achievements in reaching the targets set out by the first Millennium Development Goals. Unfortunately, extreme hunger and malnutrition remain a huge barrier to development in many countries. 795 million people are estimated to be chronically undernourished as of 2014, often as a direct consequence of environmental degradation, drought and loss of biodiversity. Over 90 million children under the age of five are dangerously underweight. And one person in every four still goes hungry in Africa.

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) aim to end all forms of hunger and malnutrition by 2030, making sure all people – especially children and the more vulnerable – have access to sufficient and nutritious food all year round. This involves promoting sustainable agricultural practices: improving the livelihoods and capacities of small scale famers, allowing equal access to land, technology and markets. It also requires international cooperation to ensure investment in infrastructure and technology to improve agricultural productivity.

Together with the other goals set out here, we can end hunger by 2030.

Zero Hunger is one of 17 Global Goals that make up the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. An integrated approach is crucial for progress across the multiple goals.

Learn more about the targets for Goal 2.

[format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

Rapid economic growth and increased agricultural productivity over the past two decades has seen the proportion of undernourished people drop by almost half.

Many developing countries that used to suffer from famine and hunger can now meet the nutritional needs of the most vulnerable. Central and East Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean have all made huge progress in eradicating extreme hunger.

These are all significant achievements in reaching the targets set out by the first Millennium Development Goals. Unfortunately, extreme hunger and malnutrition remain a huge barrier to development in many countries. 795 million people are estimated to be chronically undernourished as of 2014, often as a direct consequence of environmental degradation, drought and loss of biodiversity. Over 90 million children under the age of five are dangerously underweight. And one person in every four still goes hungry in Africa.

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) aim to end all forms of hunger and malnutrition by 2030, making sure all people – especially children and the more vulnerable – have access to sufficient and nutritious food all year round. This involves promoting sustainable agricultural practices: improving the livelihoods and capacities of small scale famers, allowing equal access to land, technology and markets. It also requires international cooperation to ensure investment in infrastructure and technology to improve agricultural productivity.

Together with the other goals set out here, we can end hunger by 2030.

Zero Hunger is one of 17 Global Goals that make up the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. An integrated approach is crucial for progress across the multiple goals.

Learn more about the targets for Goal 2.

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The SDG Fund response

Underlying the food and nutrition situation are multiple challenges in achieving sustainable food production. A rapidly growing population is increasing the demand for food. The SDG Fund programmes apply a multisectoral approach and include the following key dimensions:

  • Promotion of integrated approaches for alleviating child hunger and under-nutrition
  • Promotion of sustainable and resilient livelihoods for vulnerable households, especially in the context of adaptation to climate change
  • Strengthening of capacities to generate information allowing for improved policy-making and advocacy.

For example:

  • In Ecuador’s Imbabura region, the SDG Fund joint programme is putting into practice an integrated approach to tackle some of the most pressing challenges in the country: building income opportunities for the small farmer-owned production units, overhauling the country’s local food production for better access to safe, affordable and nutritious food and fighting malnutrition and anemia.
  • El Salvador’s government is developing new plans and regulations to tackle food security and nutrition among the most vulnerable. By reconsidering the role of women, the programme is increasing access to health services and promoting women-owned micro-businesses to reduce the high rates of under nutrition and obesity.
  • In Sri Lanka, the joint programme is addressing food insecurity by closely aligning with national policies and using surveys to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the investment on food security and nutrition. With the support of the National Nutrition Council, the programme is working with the government to take well-informed decisions on targeting the appropriate recipients and in promoting micronutrient rich foods. The programme is working to empower women and to influence behavior changes in children.
  • In Viet Nam, the SDG Fund joint programme operates in 2 provinces with extremely high poverty rates. It focuses on nutrition policies and standards, development of institutional capacity and systems, and evidence generation.
[format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

The SDG Fund response

Underlying the food and nutrition situation are multiple challenges in achieving sustainable food production. A rapidly growing population is increasing the demand for food. The SDG Fund programmes apply a multisectoral approach and include the following key dimensions:

  • Promotion of integrated approaches for alleviating child hunger and under-nutrition
  • Promotion of sustainable and resilient livelihoods for vulnerable households, especially in the context of adaptation to climate change
  • Strengthening of capacities to generate information allowing for improved policy-making and advocacy.

For example:

  • In Ecuador’s Imbabura region, the SDG Fund joint programme is putting into practice an integrated approach to tackle some of the most pressing challenges in the country: building income opportunities for the small farmer-owned production units, overhauling the country’s local food production for better access to safe, affordable and nutritious food and fighting malnutrition and anemia.
  • El Salvador’s government is developing new plans and regulations to tackle food security and nutrition among the most vulnerable. By reconsidering the role of women, the programme is increasing access to health services and promoting women-owned micro-businesses to reduce the high rates of under nutrition and obesity.
  • In Sri Lanka, the joint programme is addressing food insecurity by closely aligning with national policies and using surveys to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the investment on food security and nutrition. With the support of the National Nutrition Council, the programme is working with the government to take well-informed decisions on targeting the appropriate recipients and in promoting micronutrient rich foods. The programme is working to empower women and to influence behavior changes in children.
  • In Viet Nam, the SDG Fund joint programme operates in 2 provinces with extremely high poverty rates. It focuses on nutrition policies and standards, development of institutional capacity and systems, and evidence generation.
) ) ) [field_targets] => Array ( [und] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [value] =>
  • By 2030, end hunger and ensure access by all people, in particular the poor and people in vulnerable situations, including infants, to safe, nutritious and sufficient food all year round
  • By 2030, end all forms of malnutrition, including achieving, by 2025, the internationally agreed targets on stunting and wasting in children under 5 years of age, and address the nutritional needs of adolescent girls, pregnant and lactating women and older persons
  • By 2030, double the agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers, in particular women, indigenous peoples, family farmers, pastoralists and fishers, including through secure and equal access to land, other productive resources and inputs, knowledge, financial services, markets and opportunities for value addition and non-farm employment
  • By 2030, ensure sustainable food production systems and implement resilient agricultural practices that increase productivity and production, that help maintain ecosystems, that strengthen capacity for adaptation to climate change, extreme weather, drought, flooding and other disasters and that progressively improve land and soil quality
  • By 2020, maintain the genetic diversity of seeds, cultivated plants and farmed and domesticated animals and their related wild species, including through soundly managed and diversified seed and plant banks at the national, regional and international levels, and promote access to and fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the utilization of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge, as internationally agreed
  • Increase investment, including through enhanced international cooperation, in rural infrastructure, agricultural research and extension services, technology development and plant and livestock gene banks in order to enhance agricultural productive capacity in developing countries, in particular least developed countries
  • Correct and prevent trade restrictions and distortions in world agricultural markets, including through the parallel elimination of all forms of agricultural export subsidies and all export measures with equivalent effect, in accordance with the mandate of the Doha Development Round
  • Adopt measures to ensure the proper functioning of food commodity markets and their derivatives and facilitate timely access to market information, including on food reserves, in order to help limit extreme food price volatility
[format] => full_html [safe_value] =>
  • By 2030, end hunger and ensure access by all people, in particular the poor and people in vulnerable situations, including infants, to safe, nutritious and sufficient food all year round
  • By 2030, end all forms of malnutrition, including achieving, by 2025, the internationally agreed targets on stunting and wasting in children under 5 years of age, and address the nutritional needs of adolescent girls, pregnant and lactating women and older persons
  • By 2030, double the agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers, in particular women, indigenous peoples, family farmers, pastoralists and fishers, including through secure and equal access to land, other productive resources and inputs, knowledge, financial services, markets and opportunities for value addition and non-farm employment
  • By 2030, ensure sustainable food production systems and implement resilient agricultural practices that increase productivity and production, that help maintain ecosystems, that strengthen capacity for adaptation to climate change, extreme weather, drought, flooding and other disasters and that progressively improve land and soil quality
  • By 2020, maintain the genetic diversity of seeds, cultivated plants and farmed and domesticated animals and their related wild species, including through soundly managed and diversified seed and plant banks at the national, regional and international levels, and promote access to and fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the utilization of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge, as internationally agreed
  • Increase investment, including through enhanced international cooperation, in rural infrastructure, agricultural research and extension services, technology development and plant and livestock gene banks in order to enhance agricultural productive capacity in developing countries, in particular least developed countries
  • Correct and prevent trade restrictions and distortions in world agricultural markets, including through the parallel elimination of all forms of agricultural export subsidies and all export measures with equivalent effect, in accordance with the mandate of the Doha Development Round
  • Adopt measures to ensure the proper functioning of food commodity markets and their derivatives and facilitate timely access to market information, including on food reserves, in order to help limit extreme food price volatility
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Revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) can only be realized with a strong commitment to global partnership and cooperation. While official development assistance from developed countries increased by 66 percent between 2000 and 2014, humanitarian crises brought on by conflict or natural disasters continue to demand financial resources and aid. Many countries also require Official Development Assistance to encourage growth and trade.

The world today is more interconnected than ever before. Improving access to technology and knowledge is an important way to share ideas and foster innovation. Coordinating policies to help developing countries manage their debt, as well as promoting investment for the least developed, is vital to achieve sustainable growth and development.

The goals aim to enhance North-South and South-South cooperation by supporting national plans to achieve all the targets. Promoting international trade, and helping developing countries increase their exports, is all part of achieving a universal rules-based and equitable trading system that is fair and open, and benefits all.

Strengthening global solidarity is one of 17 Global Goals that make up the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. An integrated approach is crucial for progress across the multiple goals.

Learn more about the targets for Goal 17.

[format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

Revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) can only be realized with a strong commitment to global partnership and cooperation. While official development assistance from developed countries increased by 66 percent between 2000 and 2014, humanitarian crises brought on by conflict or natural disasters continue to demand financial resources and aid. Many countries also require Official Development Assistance to encourage growth and trade.

The world today is more interconnected than ever before. Improving access to technology and knowledge is an important way to share ideas and foster innovation. Coordinating policies to help developing countries manage their debt, as well as promoting investment for the least developed, is vital to achieve sustainable growth and development.

The goals aim to enhance North-South and South-South cooperation by supporting national plans to achieve all the targets. Promoting international trade, and helping developing countries increase their exports, is all part of achieving a universal rules-based and equitable trading system that is fair and open, and benefits all.

Strengthening global solidarity is one of 17 Global Goals that make up the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. An integrated approach is crucial for progress across the multiple goals.

Learn more about the targets for Goal 17.

) ) ) [field_the_sdgf_work] => Array ( [und] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [value] => SDG Fund’s programmes contributing to SDG 17 [format] => [safe_value] => SDG Fund’s programmes contributing to SDG 17 ) ) ) [field_icon_with_text] => Array ( [und] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [fid] => 335 [uid] => 1 [filename] => E_SDG_Icons-17.jpg [uri] => public://E_SDG_Icons-17.jpg [filemime] => image/jpeg [filesize] => 100789 [status] => 1 [timestamp] => 1450140562 [type] => image [field_file_image_alt_text] => Array ( ) [field_file_image_title_text] => Array ( ) [rdf_mapping] => Array ( ) [metadata] => Array ( [height] => 466 [width] => 466 ) [alt] => [title] => [height] => 466 [width] => 466 ) ) ) [field_the_sdg_fund_response] => Array ( [und] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [value] =>

The SDG Fund response

SDG Fund bridges the efforts of different development partners such as UN agencies, national and local governments, businesses, civil society, and academia.

All SDG Fund programmes are cooperative or joint in nature, which means UN agencies coordinate with one another and their national partners to establish integrated responses that address community-wide issues such as poor access to potable water, child nutrition, income generation for vulnerable populations, and gender parity at the institutional level. 

Sustainable development must be inclusive and people-centered. Efforts to increase the effectiveness of development cooperation should be based on basic principles of country ownership, inclusive partnerships, transparency and accountability.

For example,

  • The SDG Fund has introduced the use of matching funds that are provided by national and local governments, international donors and the private sector. This increases sustainability, impact, national ownership and the potential to scale up.  55% of the overall SDG Fund programme budget comes from matching funds.
  • To contribute to developing strong public-private partnerships, the SDG-F established a Private Sector Advisory Group formed by business leaders of major companies from various industries worldwide. These leaders are helping the SDG Fund build a roadmap for how public-private alliances can provide large-scale solutions for achieving the SDGs. Its aim is to collaborate and discuss practical solutions pertaining to the common challenges of contemporary sustainability. The Advisory Group is committed to identifying areas of common interest and deciphering the best methods of UN-private sector engagement, as well as offering suggestions for how to work more effectively at the country level.
  • A clear interest in South-South Collaboration is being incorporated from the inception of programmes. For example, in Paraguay the SDG-F is supporting the creation of a national observatory on the Right to Food in order to improve food security, nutrition policy-making and implementation. The initiative is promoting the exchange of experiences with countries that have already established similar mechanisms. In Tanzania, the SDG-F is supporting the national government to build and scale-up a pro-poor and child-sensitive national social protection system. The programme is promoting South-South Cooperation among countries that have implemented similar schemes in order to build the capacities of the Minister of Finance.
[format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

The SDG Fund response

SDG Fund bridges the efforts of different development partners such as UN agencies, national and local governments, businesses, civil society, and academia.

All SDG Fund programmes are cooperative or joint in nature, which means UN agencies coordinate with one another and their national partners to establish integrated responses that address community-wide issues such as poor access to potable water, child nutrition, income generation for vulnerable populations, and gender parity at the institutional level. 

Sustainable development must be inclusive and people-centered. Efforts to increase the effectiveness of development cooperation should be based on basic principles of country ownership, inclusive partnerships, transparency and accountability.

For example,

  • The SDG Fund has introduced the use of matching funds that are provided by national and local governments, international donors and the private sector. This increases sustainability, impact, national ownership and the potential to scale up.  55% of the overall SDG Fund programme budget comes from matching funds.
  • To contribute to developing strong public-private partnerships, the SDG-F established a Private Sector Advisory Group formed by business leaders of major companies from various industries worldwide. These leaders are helping the SDG Fund build a roadmap for how public-private alliances can provide large-scale solutions for achieving the SDGs. Its aim is to collaborate and discuss practical solutions pertaining to the common challenges of contemporary sustainability. The Advisory Group is committed to identifying areas of common interest and deciphering the best methods of UN-private sector engagement, as well as offering suggestions for how to work more effectively at the country level.
  • A clear interest in South-South Collaboration is being incorporated from the inception of programmes. For example, in Paraguay the SDG-F is supporting the creation of a national observatory on the Right to Food in order to improve food security, nutrition policy-making and implementation. The initiative is promoting the exchange of experiences with countries that have already established similar mechanisms. In Tanzania, the SDG-F is supporting the national government to build and scale-up a pro-poor and child-sensitive national social protection system. The programme is promoting South-South Cooperation among countries that have implemented similar schemes in order to build the capacities of the Minister of Finance.
) ) ) [field_targets] => Array ( [und] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [value] =>

Finance

  • Strengthen domestic resource mobilization, including through international support to developing countries, to improve domestic capacity for tax and other revenue collection
  • Developed countries to implement fully their official development assistance commitments, including the commitment by many developed countries to achieve the target of 0.7 per cent of ODA/GNI to developing countries and 0.15 to 0.20 per cent of ODA/GNI to least developed countries ODA providers are encouraged to consider setting a target to provide at least 0.20 per cent of ODA/GNI to least developed countries
  • Mobilize additional financial resources for developing countries from multiple sources
  • Assist developing countries in attaining long-term debt sustainability through coordinated policies aimed at fostering debt financing, debt relief and debt restructuring, as appropriate, and address the external debt of highly indebted poor countries to reduce debt distress
  • Adopt and implement investment promotion regimes for least developed countries

Technology

  • Enhance North-South, South-South and triangular regional and international cooperation on and access to science, technology and innovation and enhance knowledge sharing on mutually agreed terms, including through improved coordination among existing mechanisms, in particular at the United Nations level, and through a global technology facilitation mechanism
  • Promote the development, transfer, dissemination and diffusion of environmentally sound technologies to developing countries on favourable terms, including on concessional and preferential terms, as mutually agreed
  • Fully operationalize the technology bank and science, technology and innovation capacity-building mechanism for least developed countries by 2017 and enhance the use of enabling technology, in particular information and communications technology

Capacity building

  • Enhance international support for implementing effective and targeted capacity-building in developing countries to support national plans to implement all the sustainable development goals, including through North-South, South-South and triangular cooperation

Trade

  • Promote a universal, rules-based, open, non-discriminatory and equitable multilateral trading system under the World Trade Organization, including through the conclusion of negotiations under its Doha Development Agenda
  • Significantly increase the exports of developing countries, in particular with a view to doubling the least developed countries’ share of global exports by 2020
  • Realize timely implementation of duty-free and quota-free market access on a lasting basis for all least developed countries, consistent with World Trade Organization decisions, including by ensuring that preferential rules of origin applicable to imports from least developed countries are transparent and simple, and contribute to facilitating market access

Systemic issues

Policy and institutional coherence

  • Enhance global macroeconomic stability, including through policy coordination and policy coherence
  • Enhance policy coherence for sustainable development
  • Respect each country’s policy space and leadership to establish and implement policies for poverty eradication and sustainable development

Multi-stakeholder partnerships

  • Enhance the global partnership for sustainable development, complemented by multi-stakeholder partnerships that mobilize and share knowledge, expertise, technology and financial resources, to support the achievement of the sustainable development goals in all countries, in particular developing countries
  • Encourage and promote effective public, public-private and civil society partnerships, building on the experience and resourcing strategies of partnerships

Data, monitoring and accountability

  • By 2020, enhance capacity-building support to developing countries, including for least developed countries and small island developing States, to increase significantly the availability of high-quality, timely and reliable data disaggregated by income, gender, age, race, ethnicity, migratory status, disability, geographic location and other characteristics relevant in national contexts
  • By 2030, build on existing initiatives to develop measurements of progress on sustainable development that complement gross domestic product, and support statistical capacity-building in developing countries
[format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

Finance

  • Strengthen domestic resource mobilization, including through international support to developing countries, to improve domestic capacity for tax and other revenue collection
  • Developed countries to implement fully their official development assistance commitments, including the commitment by many developed countries to achieve the target of 0.7 per cent of ODA/GNI to developing countries and 0.15 to 0.20 per cent of ODA/GNI to least developed countries ODA providers are encouraged to consider setting a target to provide at least 0.20 per cent of ODA/GNI to least developed countries
  • Mobilize additional financial resources for developing countries from multiple sources
  • Assist developing countries in attaining long-term debt sustainability through coordinated policies aimed at fostering debt financing, debt relief and debt restructuring, as appropriate, and address the external debt of highly indebted poor countries to reduce debt distress
  • Adopt and implement investment promotion regimes for least developed countries

Technology

  • Enhance North-South, South-South and triangular regional and international cooperation on and access to science, technology and innovation and enhance knowledge sharing on mutually agreed terms, including through improved coordination among existing mechanisms, in particular at the United Nations level, and through a global technology facilitation mechanism
  • Promote the development, transfer, dissemination and diffusion of environmentally sound technologies to developing countries on favourable terms, including on concessional and preferential terms, as mutually agreed
  • Fully operationalize the technology bank and science, technology and innovation capacity-building mechanism for least developed countries by 2017 and enhance the use of enabling technology, in particular information and communications technology

Capacity building

  • Enhance international support for implementing effective and targeted capacity-building in developing countries to support national plans to implement all the sustainable development goals, including through North-South, South-South and triangular cooperation

Trade

  • Promote a universal, rules-based, open, non-discriminatory and equitable multilateral trading system under the World Trade Organization, including through the conclusion of negotiations under its Doha Development Agenda
  • Significantly increase the exports of developing countries, in particular with a view to doubling the least developed countries’ share of global exports by 2020
  • Realize timely implementation of duty-free and quota-free market access on a lasting basis for all least developed countries, consistent with World Trade Organization decisions, including by ensuring that preferential rules of origin applicable to imports from least developed countries are transparent and simple, and contribute to facilitating market access

Systemic issues

Policy and institutional coherence

  • Enhance global macroeconomic stability, including through policy coordination and policy coherence
  • Enhance policy coherence for sustainable development
  • Respect each country’s policy space and leadership to establish and implement policies for poverty eradication and sustainable development

Multi-stakeholder partnerships

  • Enhance the global partnership for sustainable development, complemented by multi-stakeholder partnerships that mobilize and share knowledge, expertise, technology and financial resources, to support the achievement of the sustainable development goals in all countries, in particular developing countries
  • Encourage and promote effective public, public-private and civil society partnerships, building on the experience and resourcing strategies of partnerships

Data, monitoring and accountability

  • By 2020, enhance capacity-building support to developing countries, including for least developed countries and small island developing States, to increase significantly the availability of high-quality, timely and reliable data disaggregated by income, gender, age, race, ethnicity, migratory status, disability, geographic location and other characteristics relevant in national contexts
  • By 2030, build on existing initiatives to develop measurements of progress on sustainable development that complement gross domestic product, and support statistical capacity-building in developing countries
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Underlying the food and nutrition situation are multiple challenges in achieving sustainable food production. A rapidly growing population is increasing the demand for food.

Climate change is adding to the challenge of achieving sustainable food production and meeting the demands of a growing population. Events related to climate change are likely to intensify in the coming years.

There is no magic bullet that can eliminate hunger and under-nutrition, given the complex nature of these problems. There are many inter-related issues, some of which are related to poverty and lack of empowerment. These include gender issues, discrimination against ethnic groups, land use, rights and ownership, war, the HIV pandemic, and environmental issues. Food solutions need to be integrated and multifaceted.

Efforts to realise the “right to adequate food” must go beyond improving the production and distribution of nutritious food. “Safety nets” should systematically include or be accompanied by measures to promote sustainable livelihoods for households with malnourished children.

Adequate feeding and care should be an integral part of national strategies and programmes to reduce hunger and undernutrition. This includes promoting exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months and appropriate complementary feeding, basic requirements for nutritional well being.

The SDG Fund response

Under the Food Security and Nutrition area, the SDG Fund programmes apply a multisectoral approach and include the following key dimensions:

  1. Promotion of integrated approaches for alleviating child hunger and under-nutrition
  2. Promotion of sustainable and resilient livelihoods for vulnerable households, especially in the context of adaptation to climate change
  3. Strengthening of capacities to generate information allowing for improved policy-making and advocacy.

For example:

  • El Salvador’s government is developing new plans and regulations to tackle food security and nutrition among the most vulnerable. By reconsidering the role of women, the programme will increase access to health services and promote women-owned food micro-businesses.
  • In Guatemala, the SDG Fund will work in 4 municipalities to increase the participation of children, youth, women and men in food security local governance mechanisms. These include citizen monitoring of health services, promoting the empowerment and participation of local leaders, especially women, and strengthening public local institutions.
  • In Viet Nam, the SDG Fund joint programme operates in 2 provinces with extremely high poverty rates. It focuses on nutrition policies and standards, development of institutional capacity and systems, and evidence generation.

 

Current SDG Fund food security and nutrition programmes:

CountryProgramme TitleParticipating UN AgenciesTotal Budget  ($)
BoliviaImproving the nutritional status of children from the strengthening of local production systemsFAO, UNICEF, UNIDO

1,800,000

EcuadorStrengthening local food systems and capacity building aimed at improving the production of and  access to safe food for familiesFAO, WFP, UNICEF, WHO

3,027,284

El SalvadorFood, Security and Nutrition for Children and Salvadoran Households (SANNHOS)FAO, UNICEF, WHO, WFP

4,226,164

GuatemalaFood and Nutrition Security Prioritized Municipalities of the Department of San MarcosWHO, FAO, UNICEF, WFP

3,867,712

ParaguayParaguay protects, promotes, and facilitates effective implementation of the right to Food Security and Nutrition in prioritized vulnerable populationsWHO, UNICEF, FAO, WFP

3,000,000

Sri LankaScaling up nutrition through a multi-sector approachWFP, FAO

3,010,643

Viet NamJoint Programme on Integrated Nutrition and Food Security Strategies for Children and Vulnerable Groups in Viet NamFAO, UNICEF, WHO

3,330,000

 

Total

22,261,803

Previous programmes:

Children, Food Security and Nutrition was one of eight MDG-F thematic windows. The goal of the MDG-F's work in this area was to reduce extreme poverty and hunger and halt preventable deaths caused by poor nutrition. These initiatives targeted the poorest and most vulnerable, including indigenous communities. Activities ranged from providing low cost nutritional packages to engaging with pregnant and lactating mothers to promote breastfeeding and ensure they are healthy and aware of key nutrition issues. Promoting food security and advocating for mainstreaming children's rights to food into national plans and policies are also key elements in our fight against under nutrition.

 

[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

Underlying the food and nutrition situation are multiple challenges in achieving sustainable food production. A rapidly growing population is increasing the demand for food.

Climate change is adding to the challenge of achieving sustainable food production and meeting the demands of a growing population. Events related to climate change are likely to intensify in the coming years.

There is no magic bullet that can eliminate hunger and under-nutrition, given the complex nature of these problems. There are many inter-related issues, some of which are related to poverty and lack of empowerment. These include gender issues, discrimination against ethnic groups, land use, rights and ownership, war, the HIV pandemic, and environmental issues. Food solutions need to be integrated and multifaceted.

Efforts to realise the “right to adequate food” must go beyond improving the production and distribution of nutritious food. “Safety nets” should systematically include or be accompanied by measures to promote sustainable livelihoods for households with malnourished children.

Adequate feeding and care should be an integral part of national strategies and programmes to reduce hunger and undernutrition. This includes promoting exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months and appropriate complementary feeding, basic requirements for nutritional well being.

The SDG Fund response

Under the Food Security and Nutrition area, the SDG Fund programmes apply a multisectoral approach and include the following key dimensions:

  1. Promotion of integrated approaches for alleviating child hunger and under-nutrition
  2. Promotion of sustainable and resilient livelihoods for vulnerable households, especially in the context of adaptation to climate change
  3. Strengthening of capacities to generate information allowing for improved policy-making and advocacy.

For example:

  • El Salvador’s government is developing new plans and regulations to tackle food security and nutrition among the most vulnerable. By reconsidering the role of women, the programme will increase access to health services and promote women-owned food micro-businesses.
  • In Guatemala, the SDG Fund will work in 4 municipalities to increase the participation of children, youth, women and men in food security local governance mechanisms. These include citizen monitoring of health services, promoting the empowerment and participation of local leaders, especially women, and strengthening public local institutions.
  • In Viet Nam, the SDG Fund joint programme operates in 2 provinces with extremely high poverty rates. It focuses on nutrition policies and standards, development of institutional capacity and systems, and evidence generation.

 

Current SDG Fund food security and nutrition programmes:

CountryProgramme TitleParticipating UN AgenciesTotal Budget  ($)
BoliviaImproving the nutritional status of children from the strengthening of local production systemsFAO, UNICEF, UNIDO

1,800,000

EcuadorStrengthening local food systems and capacity building aimed at improving the production of and  access to safe food for familiesFAO, WFP, UNICEF, WHO

3,027,284

El SalvadorFood, Security and Nutrition for Children and Salvadoran Households (SANNHOS)FAO, UNICEF, WHO, WFP

4,226,164

GuatemalaFood and Nutrition Security Prioritized Municipalities of the Department of San MarcosWHO, FAO, UNICEF, WFP

3,867,712

ParaguayParaguay protects, promotes, and facilitates effective implementation of the right to Food Security and Nutrition in prioritized vulnerable populationsWHO, UNICEF, FAO, WFP

3,000,000

Sri LankaScaling up nutrition through a multi-sector approachWFP, FAO

3,010,643

Viet NamJoint Programme on Integrated Nutrition and Food Security Strategies for Children and Vulnerable Groups in Viet NamFAO, UNICEF, WHO

3,330,000

 

Total

22,261,803

Previous programmes:

Children, Food Security and Nutrition was one of eight MDG-F thematic windows. The goal of the MDG-F's work in this area was to reduce extreme poverty and hunger and halt preventable deaths caused by poor nutrition. These initiatives targeted the poorest and most vulnerable, including indigenous communities. Activities ranged from providing low cost nutritional packages to engaging with pregnant and lactating mothers to promote breastfeeding and ensure they are healthy and aware of key nutrition issues. Promoting food security and advocating for mainstreaming children's rights to food into national plans and policies are also key elements in our fight against under nutrition.

 

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The global prevalence of malnutrition and hunger remains unacceptable,
undermining the prospects of millions.

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The global prevalence of malnutrition and hunger remains unacceptable,
undermining the prospects of millions.

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Seven case studies showcase how different South-South modalities can be applied on the ground. [format] => [safe_value] => This publication explores how WFP facilitates South-South cooperation to help countries advance their national objectives and build capacities to fight hunger and malnutrition towards achieving Agenda 2030. 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