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A New Way of Doing Business: Partnering for Sustainable Development and Peace

This report, prepared jointly by the International Peace Institute, the SDG Fund and Concordia, explores what is needed to make this new partnership a reality, including the steps that both the UN and the private sector need to take. It also seeks to understand how the private sector can contribute to achieving peace as both an enabler and an outcome of the 2030 Agenda. Finally, the report aims to address how to mitigate the risk companies face in investing in countries facing challenges in attracting private domestic and international investments.

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Universality and the SDGs: A Business Perspective

This report prepared by the SDG Fund in collaboration with its Private Sector Advisory Group and the Global Compact highlights varied perspectives from both large and small companies working to understand the commonality of the new development agenda. This report is based on interviews and input from private sector leaders through workshops in Africa, Latin America, Europe and the United States, with more than 100 firms representing various regions and industry sectors. The year-long series of workshops and interactive discussions provided valuable insight in to how companies were working to address the new set of goals. It also suggests many firms are working in the areas of SDGs, yet their work is not always linked to the goals or articulated as such.

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Business and the United Nations: Working together towards the Sustainable Development Goals: A Framework for Action

This publication focuses on insight and best practices culled from interviews with business leaders which are designed to help both the private sector, the UN, and other practitioners learn from each other. These business leaders represent a selected group of companies from several regions of the world and a variety of industries that are part of the SDG Fund Private Sector Advisory Group. There is a renewed emphasis across the United Nations on partnering with responsible businesses to deliver sustainable development on the ground. This report offers fresh perspectives on a variety of topics including improving the climate for partnership design, co-creation, combining complementary skills, and developing solutions to harness the full potential of what business can bring to the development table.

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Water and sustainable development: from vision to action

This report of the 2015 UN-Water Zargoza Conference is compiled by the United Nations Office to support the International Decade for Action, 'Water for Life' 2005-2015. It includes the views of different stakeholders (Civil Society, Business, Academia, Governments and Global actors) about their role and their views about each others roles in the implementation of the water-related SDGs.

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Water and sanitation interlinkages across the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

This UN-Water Analytical Brief analyses the central role of water and sanitation to describe the links and interdependencies between the targets of Sustainable Development Goal 6 on water and sanitation and those of other Goals. It aims to stimulate United Nations Member States’ consideration of the water-related linkages within the Goals to facilitate an integrated approach to implementation. The Brief highlights the importance of mainstreaming water and sanitation in the policies and plans of other sectors, and how the management of interlinkages supports the social, economic and environmental dimensions of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

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Who will be accountable? Human rights and the post-2015 development agenda

This publication is intended to help fill some of the more pressing accountability gaps that impede the realization of global and national development goals. We approach this challenge from the perspective of human rights, as a universal normative and legally binding framework embodying the minimum requirements of a dignified life, encapsulating universal values that a post-2015 agreement should strive to prioritize and protect as well as essential features of a road map to take us there.

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The business case for off-grid energy in India

This report sets out to boost entrepreneurial activity and private sector investment in renewable off-grid energy (OGE) by assessing the market, identifying business models with the greatest potential to achieve scale, and recommending investments that will be catalytic for the sector.

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Evaluation of FAO’s contribution in Guyana

The Country Programme Evaluation of FAO’s contribution in Guyana was conducted in 2015 with the main aim of informing the development of the new CPF cycle starting in 2016. It is intended that this exercise will provide inputs to better orient FAO’s programme in the next biennium, making it more relevant to the government priorities for the country. The evaluation was also intended to assess the strategic relevance in the national context of FAO’s programmes and interventions in Guyana.

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South-South and Triangular Cooperation for food security and nutrition

This publication explores how WFP facilitates South-South cooperation to help countries advance their national objectives and build capacities to fight hunger and malnutrition towards achieving Agenda 2030. Seven case studies showcase how different South-South modalities can be applied on the ground.

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IFAD’s approach in Small Island Developing States

This paper outlines IFAD’s strategic approach to enhancing food security and promoting sustainable smallholder agriculture development in Small Island Developing States (SIDS) in the context of exacerbated impacts of climate change and persistent challenges to market access. A renewed approach will provide an opportunity for increasing results and impacts from agriculture and fisheries, reducing the high transaction costs of project delivery in SIDS, adjusting to an ever-changing development environment and – most of all – avoiding the overlooking of SIDS’ persistent fragility and the risk that they are cut off from development assistance.

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Learning from each other: South-South and triangular cooperation in East and Southern Africa

South-South and triangular cooperation has an enormous potential role in agriculture and rural development in developing countries, both in unlocking diverse experiences and lessons and in providing solutions to pressing development challenges. From the cases in this publication, a number of common lessons emerge. Meanwhile, the importance of adaptation also emerged from these documented cases. Inspiring examples in other regions or countries encourage people to take up certain approaches, but they can almost never be copied exactly into any new context.

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Youth and agriculture: key challenges and concrete solutions

Global population is expected to increase to 9 billion by 2050, with youth (aged 15–24) accounting for about 14 percent of this total. While the world’s youth cohort is expected to grow, employment and entrepreneurial opportunities for youth – particularly those living in developing countries’ economically stagnant rural areas – remain limited, poorly remunerated and of poor quality. In recognition of the agricultural sector’s potential to serve as a source of livelihood opportunities for rural youth, a joint MIJARC/FAO/IFAD project on Facilitating Access of Rural Youth to Agricultural Activities was carried out in 2011 to assess the challenges and opportunities with respect to increasing rural youth’s participation in the sector. Over the course of the project, six principal challenges were identified. For each challenge, this publication presents a series of relevant case studies that serve as examples of how this challenge may be overcome.

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Agricultural and rural development reconsidered

This paper is a guide to current debates about agricultural development. It analyses the changes in development approaches and thinking in recent decades and explores today's critical issues in agricultural and rural development policy. With the main focus on Africa, the paper also includes insights from Asia and Latin America.

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Global Education Monitoring (GEM) Report 2016. Education for people and planet: creating sustainable futures for all

The Incheon Declaration for Education 2030 has been instrumental to shape the Sustainable Development Goal on Education to “Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all”. It entrusts UNESCO with the leadership, coordination and monitoring of the Education 2030 agenda. It also calls upon the Global Education Monitoring (GEM) Report to provide independent monitoring and reporting of the Sustainable Development Goal on education (SDG 4), and on education in the other SDGs, for the next fifteen years. The ultimate goal of this agenda is to leave no one behind. This calls for robust data and sound monitoring. The 2016 edition of the GEM Report provides valuable insight for governments and policy makers to monitor and accelerate progress towards SDG 4, building on the indicators and targets we have, with equity and inclusion as measures of overall success.

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Efficient and sustainable HIV responses: case studies on country progress

As the world economic landscape changes, so too does the HIV funding landscape. The limited resources available require more emphasis on value for money. This case study report consists of eight case studies. It highlights countries’ progress in making their HIV response more efficient or increasing domestic HIV funding, contributing to sustainability, increased scale-up and country ownership. Cambodia and Myanmar have re-allocated resources towards high-impact interventions. South Africa and Swaziland have saved millions by improving their antiretroviral drug tenders. Kenya, Namibia, Malawi and Kazakhstan have taken active steps for a future with fewer external funds. Each country has evolved strategies that other countries may apply to their particular context. The examples given here aim to catalyse country-driven action to make efficiency and sustainably funded HIV services the reality in the HIV response.

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Communities deliver: the critical role of communities in reaching global targets to end the AIDS epidemic

This report draws on multiple sources to document the many ways in which communities are advancing the response to AIDS, and the evidence for the effectiveness of these responses. Core areas of community-based activities include advocacy, service provision, community-based research and financing; each of these areas is illustrated by examples of community-based actions.

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UNAIDS 2016–2021 strategy: on the fast-track to end AIDS

The 2016–2021 Strategic Leadership Agenda is deliberately organized within the SDG framework around five SDGs most relevant to the AIDS response. Fast-Tracking the response will require development efforts to ensure good health, reduce inequalities, achieve gender equality, promote just and inclusive societies and revitalize global partnerships. Other SDGs are, however, pertinent to the AIDS response. Ten critical targets have been set—measurable targets that have been modelled as those most critical to ensure that the ambitious Fast-Track goals will be met. The targets, however, do not represent the totality of concerted effort needed across the result areas. The result areas constitute core dynamic and cross-cutting programmes of work, which will contribute to the achievement of all the targets. Achieving a set of prioritized targets and results will translate into better social, educational and economic outcomes and into health, human rights and dignity for millions of people—a continuation of the role of the AIDS response as a pathfinder for social justice and sustainable development

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Sustaining the human rights response to HIV

The human rights response to HIV, largely implemented by civil society, has been crucial to the HIV response, but it appears that the funding for this work is insufficient and may be threatened further. Based on these concerns—and with the support of the Ford Foundation—UNAIDS commissioned research to better understand the current and future funding landscape as experienced by the civil society groups that are implementing key human rights programmes in the HIV response. This paper presents the results of this research and makes recommendations in an effort to ensure sufficient and sustainable funding for that crucial work until the end of the AIDS epidemic.

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Public-private partnerships in the Caribbean: building on early lessons

This publication considers cases studies and the experiences of other multilateral institutions, concentrating on design and implementation issues, as well as lessons learnt. It seeks to identify priority policy actions that should be taken by Regional governments, with the support of Caribbean Development Bank, to improve Public-Private Partnerships usage and enhance related development outcomes.

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Connecting Asia: infrastructure for integrating South and Southeast Asia

This publication analyses how closer regional connectivity and economic integration between South Asia and Southeast Asia can benefit both regions. With a focus on the role played by infrastructure and public policies in facilitating this process, it provides a detailed and up-to-date discussion of issues, innovations, and progress. Country studies of national connectivity issues and policies cover Bangladesh, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka, and Thailand, examining major developments in trade and investment, economic cooperation, the role of economic corridors, and regional cooperation initiatives. Thematic chapters explore investment in land and sea transport infrastructure, trade facilitation, infrastructure investment financing, supporting national and regional policies, and model-based estimates of the benefits of integration. They also identify significant opportunities for strengthening these integration efforts as a result of the recent opening up of Myanmar in political, economic, and financial terms. For the first time for these regions, the book employs a state-of-the-art computable general equilibrium (CGE) model incorporating heterogeneous firms to estimate the advantages of integration.

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Preparing a public-private partnership law: observations from the international experience

This working paper provides observations from an international perspective that are relevant to preparing and strengthening public–private partnership (PPP) laws in developing Asia, with an emphasis on East Asia. The observations are derived from a careful analysis and practical experience of the PPP legal framework in a variety of countries. Laws and guidance from many countries have been reviewed to identify common content and trends in how these have evolved in the light of implementation experience. The analysis identifies a broad consistency as to what are considered to be desirable and undesirable elements in the overall PPP legal framework, while recognizing that the distribution of content between a PPP law and supporting legal instruments and guidance varies between countries. It suggests issues to be considered and addressed when finalizing a PPP law but leaves open how these should be resolved.

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Public–private partnership funds: observations from international experience

To help improve public service delivery, many countries have established funds to help finance their public–private partnership (PPP) programs. This paper examines the international experience with three types of funds: Each type has a very precise purpose and is designed to address a specific constraint to developing bankable PPP projects. The analysis reveals that funds must be designed well to address specific problems and that dedicated funds can provide better incentives, concentrate expertise, and promote PPPs. With this knowledge, ADB is helping the People’s Republic of China investigate the use of funds and other facilities for providing government financial support to PPPs.

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Enhancing urban climate change resilience: seven entry points for action

Growing interest in the concept of urban climate change resilience (UCCR) recognizes the complexity of rapid urbanization and uncertainties associated with climate change. This working paper synthesizes existing knowledge on urban climate change resilience to identify seven entry points for actions. It is expected that the proposed entry points will benefit ADB’s developing member countries, development partners, staffs and projects under the Urban Climate Change Resilience Trust Fund to take actions for strengthening urban resilience.

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Financing mechanisms for wastewater and sanitation

This publication is a guide for government and city planners to identify financing mechanisms as they develop their own wastewater and sanitation projects. Case studies culled from various countries provide insight on various financing instrumentalities (subsidies, output-based or performance-based aid, carbon credits, and revolving funds) and financing arrangements (local government–water utility operator and public–private partnership) available to support the sanitation agenda. Financing flowcharts should help planners visualise the flow of funds and identify funding sources, including grants and loans. Examples of financing mechanisms can help cities identify business models they can adopt given their specific circumstances.

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Philippines: management of contingent liabilities arising from public-private partnership projects

With a rapidly expanding public-private partnership (PPP) project portfolio and based on past lessons learned, the government needs to improve management of contingent liabilities arising from the PPP contracts. This study shows that major directions requiring further eff„ort include: 1) better pricing of government guarantees; 2) adoption of methodology for quantification of contingent liabilities, setting prudential limits on PPP contingent liabilities; 3) development of procedures for payment of materialized contingent liabilities from the national budget’s unprogrammed fund; 4) in the medium term, setting up a contingent liabilities fund financed through budget appropriations and contributions of project sponsors.

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